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Assignment 3

September 14, 2009

1) Harmonic note – Violin

Freesound link: http://www.freesound.org/samplesViewSingle.php?id=1269

Spectrum:
Lucy Bailey

Spectrogram:

Lucy Bailey

Both the spectrum and the spectrogram reinforce the listener’s impression of the violin note as a harmonic and stable sound.  From the spectrum, we see a clear set of harmonics which are multiples of the fundamental frequency.  A similar effect is also evident based on the spectrogram, where the fundamental frequency is a red/orange color with each of the yellow/green lines over it representing the harmonic frequencies which help characterize the sound of the violin.

2) Sharp attacks – typing

Freesound link: http://www.freesound.org/samplesViewSingle.php?id=137

Spectrum:
Lucy Bailey

Spectrogram:
Lucy Bailey

The spectrum of the typing sound sharply contrasts with that of the held note from the violin because it does not show a set of frequencies forming an overtone series over the fundamental.  Because of the nature of typing as an inharmonic, short, sharp sound, it is difficult to see a defined pitch or fundamental frequency for the sound.  The spectrogram also illustrates the sound as such because it does not show a clear fundamental frequency with overtones as would occur for a single pitch.

3) Inharmonic sound with partials – metal sheet

Freesound: http://www.freesound.org/samplesViewSingle.php?id=60343

Spectrum:Lucy Bailey

Spectrogram: Lucy Bailey

This sound of a metal sheet being vibrated is more harmonic than the typing sound was, as illustrated by its spectrum and spectrogram.   The spectrum indicates that there is at least one primary frequency which gives the sound its pitch.  The fundamental frequency of the sound is at a low frequency with most other frequencies not contributing very much.  The spectrogram illustrates this characteristic as well because of the red color where the fundamental is and with a couple of yellow lines where overtone frequencies would be, but not in a clear pattern and not at very high frequencies.

4) Bird sound – Nightingale

Freesound: http://www.freesound.org/samplesViewSingle.php?id=35027

Spectrum:Lucy Bailey

Spectrogram: Lucy Bailey

The spectrum of this sound illustrates the fundamental frequency of the nightingale’s call along with a couple of louder harmonics at higher frequencies.  The spectrogram illustrates the time-related characteristics of the sound, showing the repetitive nature of the call and how it repeats at about the same pitch each time.  The intensity of the harmonics vary a bit, but the fundamental pitch stays pretty much constant throughout the clip.

-Lucy

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One Comment leave one →
  1. September 15, 2009 2:09 pm

    When it is a harmonic sound, like the violin, it is good in the spectrogram to zoom in vertically (the frequencies) so we see the harmonics better.

    The metal sheet is definitely inharmonic, but it has partials, which the typing sound does not have. Also zooming in the spectrogram we could see better the different partials and their frequency variation on time.

    In the bird the frequency change is quite important, but the pattern repeats every time. Thus it is not a constant pitch.

    …xavier

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